A Day in the Life of a Sky Diver

It has never been a life-long ambition of mine to do a sky dive, however, when the idea was raised about a year ago, I thought why the hell not.  Having paid the deposit and booked the date things certainly became more real!

On approach to the day in question I couldn’t believe how calm I felt, everyone questioned how I was feeling and I felt fine.

Then the day finally arrived, and having attempted some breakfast we set off to Hibaldstow Airfield.  On the 1 ½ hour journey my other half, Tom, sister, Joanne and nephew, Alfie attempted to keep the conversation light, however, there was no denying it, in less than a few hours I would be jumping out of a plane!

On arriving at the airfield I was surprised to see so many other people there to do the exact same as me, as well as all their friends and family spectators.

After all the form filling we were given a number and told we would be called, it was like waiting to be executed!! We sat alongside many other anxious faces in the on-site café and waited.

When they finally called me we were ushered in to a room asked to sign our lives away and told we didn’t need to know much but the three main things were to keep hold of your harness until we were out of the plane, tuck your legs up and do not grab the instructors hands, as this could be fatal (obviously they have to pull the parachute!).

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Then came the gear-up part! We put on our diving overalls, helmets, gloves and goggles. We were led outside, had time to say a quick farewell to family and friends and were led to the plane!! Luckily at the time I didn’t notice the plane was called Hav-oc!

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Our ascent to 15,000 ft went extremely quickly, in which time the straps holding me and my instructor were tightened and he kept running through what would happen when the door to the plane opened.  I had agreed to go second (although in all honesty I would have liked to go first so I didn’t have to watch anyone else jump out before me!!).  As the first person jumped, I was shuffled off the bench and towards the door, where there was nothing between me and a 15,000 ft drop!  The cameramen were amazing, hanging on to the outside of the plane filming every second of your amazing journey, a slight rocking motion and we had jumped!!

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We were falling, well flying at 120mph towards the ground covering 7,000 ft in less than a minute, I couldn’t speak due to the speed but could somehow scream!! All I remember was how cold it was and when the parachute finally went up a massive sense of relief, I was safe – well safer!!

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During the rest of the journey down my instructor pointed out land marks, where we would land and where the spectators were stood, the views were breathtaking, a patchwork of art, and before I knew it we were coming in to land, feet up in the air and then a standing land.  I had done it, but couldn’t quite believe it and still can’t!!

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The rest of the day was a lot of questioning as to how I felt and would I do it again, and I have to say I definitely would!!

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Nicola Heaversedge skydived for MacMillan Cancer Support. To learn more about our charity  fund-raising, please visit our charity page.

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